• Tue. Oct 19th, 2021

Apple iPhone Android FluBot Cell Phone Text Scam Change Makes Falling In Love Easier Than EVER

ByCindy J. Daddario

Oct 4, 2021

A terrifying and infuriating new way FluBot scammers try to steal your money and it’s easier than EVER to fall in love – here’s how to spot shady messages

  • The latest version of SMS scams are the most devious of all time
  • It tells users that they have been hacked and all of their photos have been uploaded
  • By clicking on the link, the phone is infected and you need to download an app to fix it
  • The “fix” is actually malware that will hijack your secret usernames and passwords.










Clever hackers have once again changed their tactics to make the annoying FluBot text scam even more dangerous for reckless users by claiming that your photos have now been stolen.

To add to the confusion, when worried users click the last link in scam texts, it tells you that your phone is already infected – and links to an app that claims to fix the problem.

But the “fix” is actually a malicious application that will steal your usernames, passwords, bank details and even all of your contact details.

Now Scamwatch – run by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission – has warned anyone who receives the latest texts: “Remove them immediately”.

Clever hackers have changed their tactics yet again to make FluBot annoying text scam even more dangerous for reckless users by claiming your photos have now been stolen (stock image)

When you click on the last link in scam text messages (photo), it tells you that your phone is already infected - and links to an app that claims to fix the problem

When you click on the last link in scam text messages (photo), it tells you that your phone is already infected – and links to an app that claims to fix the problem

Cell phone owners have been plagued by an endless stream of weird misspelled texts, claiming first you have voicemail, then you have a package.

They all included a link that downloaded an app on Android phones that could hijack all of your personal information.

But the latest version of the scam is the most sophisticated yet – and experts fear many will fall for it.

One of the scam texts reads: “Someone downloaded your | pictures. An entire album is downloaded – | here: … t0hk [plus a link]’

According to experts, random punctuation marks and misspelled words are used by hackers to avoid spam filters.

Cell phone owners have been plagued by an endless stream of weird misspelled texts (pictured) claiming you have voicemail first, then you have a package

Cell phone owners have been plagued by an endless stream of weird misspelled texts (pictured) claiming you have voicemail first, then you have a package

Scamwatch has now sent an urgent warning: “The Flubot scam has changed again!”

“The text messages now say your photos have been uploaded and the text link leads to a page that says your device is already infected.

“Think 3D: DON’T click on links, DO NOT download, and DO NOT DELETE! “

Scamwatch has received over 13,000 text complaints since the hacking campaign began in early August.

This comes in a year where Australians have lost over $ 211 million to scams, nearly double the amount last year, with over $ 63 million lost from phone scams.

Fake phone call scams have also taken off with more than 100,000 complaints of hackers posing as workers at large companies (pictured, one of the scam text messages)

Fake phone call scams have also taken off with more than 100,000 complaints of hackers posing as workers at large companies (pictured, one of the scam text messages)

“It is of great concern to see these scams evolve and become more sophisticated to steal even more money from unsuspecting people,” said ACCC Vice President Delia Rickard.

“While the proportion of reports involving financial loss has declined this year, people who lose money are losing more.

“The average loss so far this year is around $ 11,000, compared to $ 7,000 for the same period in 2020.”

Fake phone call scams have also taken off with more than 100,000 complaints of hackers posing as workers at large companies.

Scamwatch has received over 13,000 text complaints since the hack campaign (pictured) began in early August

Scamwatch has received over 13,000 text complaints since the hack campaign (pictured) began in early August

“The crooks claim to be from companies such as Amazon or eBay and claim that large purchases were made on the victim’s credit card,” Ms. Rickard added.

“When they claim to help you process a refund, they are actually gaining remote access to your computer and stealing your personal and banking information.”

She added: “These scams are of particular concern in our current climate, as many people are turning to online shopping due to the Covid lockdowns.”


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